[CSA]: The Final Week!

Well- the week hasn't exactly gone as planned so, Winter CSA details have to be withheld for another week. Bummer.

Why no Winter CSA (yet)? The Hoophouse Saga of the Fall As I may have mentioned to some, we really wanted successful fall carrots so, we sacrificed a great deal of our hoophouse (an unheated greenhouse) space to grow some awesome carrots for you. That space was typically set aside for fall and early winter spinach/lettuce, making me nervous that we would not have the product needed for November/December CSA.

But, we're building another hoophouse! Woohoo!

Once that hoop is up, we'll have increased our growing space by 1/3! However, that hoophouse is going up in early November, leaving little time, again, to have much going on in November (hint: Winter CSA).

So, we're reimagining Winter CSA for this season but, I'll have set ideas and plans by next week. We won't leave you hanging though! Not sure about this new Winter CSA or a Thanksgiving box?  No problem!

We're at farmers markets all throughout the winter.

Our Farmers Market Schedule

Allen Street Farmers Market Wednesdays 3:00-6:30  inside Allen Neighborhood Center Lansing, MI

November 14 December 19 January 9 & 23 February 6 & 20 March 6 & 20 April 10 & 24

Meridian Twp Farmers Market inside the Meridian Mall Saturdays 10:00am-2:00pm Okemos, MI

1st and 3rd Saturdays of the month, December-April

Hope to see you there!  

The Menu


Please Choose up to 9 different Veggies

  • Pears! Unnamed and antique...

    • RIPEN these! Put them in a warm place for a few days until they're slightly soft to the touch.

    • They're not exactly from our farm btw... We've admired this pear tree for years as it's behind a neighbor's house and on the edge of a field we rent from them. This year, it was packed with fruit! The neighbor HATES having to pick them up or run them over with his lawnmower so, we grabbed a ladder and picked them off the tree. They've never been sprayed as the tree is basically abandoned. They look like a squat Bartlett but, the owner says the tree has been there for 50+ years. 

  • Red or Yellow Storage Onions

  • Garlic

  • Sweet Bell Peppers

    • Unsorted and harvested before the frost.

  • Kossack Kohlrabi

    • Huge but, tasty!

  • Celeriac

  • Rutabagas

  • Brussels Sprouts

  • Sweet Potatoes

    • Smaller than we'd hoped but, still tasty.

    • Both white and traditional red. They're cured and ready to go!

  • Carrots!

  • Daikon Radishes

  • Winter Squash: Butternut, Acorn, Carnival or Delicata

  • Heirloom Winter Squash and Pie Pumpkins

    • No squashapalooza this year :( You'll find our heirloom squash to be a bit smaller and less abundant than previous years.

  • Beets!

  • Cabbage

    • They turned out to be much smaller than desired but, still awfully tasty!

  • Leeks!

Maybe List

  • Kale OR Lettuce OR Bok Choy

Recipe Ideas: Squash and Pumpkins II

Perhaps not everyone saw the "Squash Recipes I" but, this time I want to focus more on Butternut, heirloom squash and pie pumpkins.

Let's start with pie pumpkins... Granted just about any squash can be turned into a pie, we like to grow a few different kinds for maximum tastiness. 'Winter Luxury' and 'Touch of Autumn' are our go-to varieties of pumpkins for pies but, feel free to mix some butternut or heirloom squash in there too.

Roasting is by far the best way to cook these for pie prep. Roast in wedges, puree and even freeze for later use. The Pioneer Woman has it right.

Then, follow your favorite pie, muffin or bread recipe anytime this winter!

Butternut squash is easily the most versatile of squash. It has a smooth texture and lighter flavor than many other varieties. The long neck also makes it easy to handle.

One of my favorite things to do is squash soup. For something a little different, try this Curried Butternut Squash soup from the Minimalist Baker. Curry and squash always make a lovely combo!

For something a little more traditional, there's the classic Squash Soup. Or, while I haven't tried this one yet, an Instant Pot version.

If creamy squash soup isn't your thing (or you want to try something new), try throwing it into a chili!

Thanks to CSAer Autumn for this recipe from Simply Recipes for Best Pumpkin Chili. The creaminess and sweetness of the squash goes perfectly with all the spices and textures of a chili.

Along those lines, try making posole! This recipe from Food52is a spicy blend of chile paste, hominy, and squash. Although I have the urge to crack an egg on top of this (shashuska style).

All of the heirloom squash you'll see at CSA is edible and tasty! From variety to variety or from squash to squash, they will tend to vary in stringiness and water content. 

If you're not sure what to do, make soup/chili/posole in order to compensate for any watery-ness. Or, roast and blend for pies!

I really love to stuff these round lovelies for Thanksgiving and serve in wedges. I tend to do all sort of variations but, it usually ends up being something close to this Kale and Wild Rice Stuffed Squash. Or, this, Pumpkin Stuffed with Everything Good.

 

[CSA]: Week 18

The Menu

Please Choose 8

  • Sweet Potatoes!

    • Smaller than we'd hoped but, still tasty.

    • Both white and traditional red. They're cured and ready to go!

  • Brussels Sprouts

  • Carrots!

  • Celeriac

  • Garlic

  • Red or Yellow Storage Onions

  • Hot Peppers

  • Sweet Bell Peppers and Carmen/Escamillo

  • Daikon Radishes

  • Winter Squash: Pie Pumpkins, Butternut, Acorn, Carnival or Delicata

  • Kossack Kohlrabi

  • Parsley, Sage, Thyme

Maybe List

  • Cabbage

  • Regular Radishes

  • Beets

The "Let's See How Bad the Frost is this Week" List 

  • Lettuce!

    • Green leaf lettuce is ready to go, along with romaine. We harvested all that we could tonight and we hope it's enough for the week.

  • Kale?

    • Sometimes kale can take a hit during the first frost. It's unlikely but, I've seen it happen. We'll know more in the morning!

Recipe Ideas: Daikon (and other) Radishes

Daikon radishes are commonly seen in Japanese and other Asian recipes and are easily identified by their long, often white roots. We offer white or purple more Korean-style daikon, shorter and stubbier roots with a lovely, mild radish flavor.

They can be eaten raw or, roastedto make the flavor a little milder and soften the texture.

But, in the "daikon" bin at CSA, we've actually had a few other random roots thrown into the mix. Beyond the purple or white daikon are also black spanishradishes

Black Spanish radish is quite a bit more pungent but, that pungency lies in the skin. The skin is also fairly thick so, it's best to peel the outside if you're unsure about this veggie. 

The third root and radish in the bin would be Watermelon radishes. These mild beauties are great raw or pickled but, can be cooked too. Due to their appearance, it really is lovely to see them in salads or, roasted in wedges.

While trying to use up our Winter share of daikons last year, I discovered that daikon is also a popular veggie in India. Mooli (or daikon) is often used in a dal (judging by the prevalence of this recipe) and, the greens are often combined with the root to make Mooli and Moong Dal. I have created a few less complex things with curry paste and daikons and it was delicious (but, I love curry) plus, I don't have a go-to Indian recipe source just yet.

When in doubt, roast it. Try these spicy roasted daikon french fries to start!

We've thrown any and all of these radishes into meaty roasts or onto sheet pans (along with other veggies) and played a fun game of "which root is that." That's not to say they aren't enjoyable but, sometimes it's just easier to mix them in with other roots. We've also tried just about every veggiein pancake form, including daikons.

Still, whenever I make a stir-fry or a brothy soup, thinly sliced daikon or black Spanish radish make an excellent, crunchy and spicy addition!

If you're really on the fence, try them pickled. Add pickled daikon onto sandwiches, soups, any BBQ or heavy meat dish to lighten it up with freshness and acidity. Try these quick pickled carrots and daikon, that are basically just sugar, vinegar, and good root veggies.

[CSA]: Week 17

The Menu

Please Choose 8

  • Brussels Sprouts

  • Leeks

  • Shallots

  • Rutabagas

    • for those who have seen our rutabagas before, these are more reasonable in size than previous years.

  • Celeriac

  • Garlic

  • Red or Yellow Storage Onions

  • Hot Peppers

    • Maybe for the last time :(

  • Sweet Bell Peppers and Carmen/Escamillo

  • Kale

  • Daikon Radishes

  • Winter Squash: Pie Pumpkins, Butternut or Acorn

  • Kossack Kohlrabi

  • Parsley, Sage, Thyme

    • The best herbs for fall I'd say!

Maybe List

  • Broccoli

  • Cabbage

  • Regular Radishes

  • Beets

  • Mini Eggplant

Recipe Ideas: Rutabagas and Celeriac

It's the revenge of the roots! It's definitely a weird-root week, sprinkled with a little cabbage-y goodness.

Rutabagas are traditionally used in pasties, the yooper delicacy that actually has Cornish roots. However, they are much more versatile than this simple meat pie. Think of them like a potato, a much less starchy potato granted but, dense with a solid flesh. Great roasted, (such as in this recipe with maple syrup and chile), in soups (like this apple/rutabaga/squash soup) or mashed

But, for the record, a pasty is still a great idea. If you're not familiar, a pasty is basically just a meat-pie. Every culture seems to h ave some variance of the meat and veggie pie (or just veggie). 

I don't really follow a recipe for this one, but, tend to go a little heavy (and weird) on the veggies, using kohlrabi, turnips, carrots, onions, parsnips, daikon radishes or whatever I have on hand... but, rutabagas, of course. Just make sure they're all chopped in similar sizes. A friend makes a vegetarian version with mushrooms that is also pretty lovely.

Here is a genuine pasty recipe from Lawry's Pasties (located in Ishpeming and Marquette). Get the recipe for pasties here. 

Celeriac can be just as confusing if it's your first time seeing one. 

Celeriac oxidizes quickly so, the bright white and slightly softer, but still dense interior, will begin to brown once cut. 

It tastes exactly like celery but, without the stringiness and occasional bitterness. 

Celeriac can be roasted, made into soups or mashed, just as rutabagas.

Try a whole, roasted celeriac such as this recipe with za'atar... a spice I love to keep on hand to sprinkle on almost anything.

Otherwise, my mother has always made some form of celeriac (or rutabagas) into a gratin. Basically, root veggies cooked with milk and cheese. Try this Jamie Oliver version of a Celeriac Gratin.

Celeriac can also be eaten raw.We frequently grate it into salads, coleslaws or, make it into a full-on slaw with kohlrabi. 

The first time I ever had celeriac was in Southern France... where Celeriac Remoulade is sold ready-made. It's soooo easy and I have no idea why it works but, it's creamy, bright and luscious. Mustard, mayo and lemon juice... that's it.