[CSA]: Week 18

The Menu

Please Choose 8

  • Sweet Potatoes!

    • Smaller than we'd hoped but, still tasty.

    • Both white and traditional red. They're cured and ready to go!

  • Brussels Sprouts

  • Carrots!

  • Celeriac

  • Garlic

  • Red or Yellow Storage Onions

  • Hot Peppers

  • Sweet Bell Peppers and Carmen/Escamillo

  • Daikon Radishes

  • Winter Squash: Pie Pumpkins, Butternut, Acorn, Carnival or Delicata

  • Kossack Kohlrabi

  • Parsley, Sage, Thyme

Maybe List

  • Cabbage

  • Regular Radishes

  • Beets

The "Let's See How Bad the Frost is this Week" List 

  • Lettuce!

    • Green leaf lettuce is ready to go, along with romaine. We harvested all that we could tonight and we hope it's enough for the week.

  • Kale?

    • Sometimes kale can take a hit during the first frost. It's unlikely but, I've seen it happen. We'll know more in the morning!

Recipe Ideas: Daikon (and other) Radishes

Daikon radishes are commonly seen in Japanese and other Asian recipes and are easily identified by their long, often white roots. We offer white or purple more Korean-style daikon, shorter and stubbier roots with a lovely, mild radish flavor.

They can be eaten raw or, roastedto make the flavor a little milder and soften the texture.

But, in the "daikon" bin at CSA, we've actually had a few other random roots thrown into the mix. Beyond the purple or white daikon are also black spanishradishes

Black Spanish radish is quite a bit more pungent but, that pungency lies in the skin. The skin is also fairly thick so, it's best to peel the outside if you're unsure about this veggie. 

The third root and radish in the bin would be Watermelon radishes. These mild beauties are great raw or pickled but, can be cooked too. Due to their appearance, it really is lovely to see them in salads or, roasted in wedges.

While trying to use up our Winter share of daikons last year, I discovered that daikon is also a popular veggie in India. Mooli (or daikon) is often used in a dal (judging by the prevalence of this recipe) and, the greens are often combined with the root to make Mooli and Moong Dal. I have created a few less complex things with curry paste and daikons and it was delicious (but, I love curry) plus, I don't have a go-to Indian recipe source just yet.

When in doubt, roast it. Try these spicy roasted daikon french fries to start!

We've thrown any and all of these radishes into meaty roasts or onto sheet pans (along with other veggies) and played a fun game of "which root is that." That's not to say they aren't enjoyable but, sometimes it's just easier to mix them in with other roots. We've also tried just about every veggiein pancake form, including daikons.

Still, whenever I make a stir-fry or a brothy soup, thinly sliced daikon or black Spanish radish make an excellent, crunchy and spicy addition!

If you're really on the fence, try them pickled. Add pickled daikon onto sandwiches, soups, any BBQ or heavy meat dish to lighten it up with freshness and acidity. Try these quick pickled carrots and daikon, that are basically just sugar, vinegar, and good root veggies.

[CSA]: Week 17

The Menu

Please Choose 8

  • Brussels Sprouts

  • Leeks

  • Shallots

  • Rutabagas

    • for those who have seen our rutabagas before, these are more reasonable in size than previous years.

  • Celeriac

  • Garlic

  • Red or Yellow Storage Onions

  • Hot Peppers

    • Maybe for the last time :(

  • Sweet Bell Peppers and Carmen/Escamillo

  • Kale

  • Daikon Radishes

  • Winter Squash: Pie Pumpkins, Butternut or Acorn

  • Kossack Kohlrabi

  • Parsley, Sage, Thyme

    • The best herbs for fall I'd say!

Maybe List

  • Broccoli

  • Cabbage

  • Regular Radishes

  • Beets

  • Mini Eggplant

Recipe Ideas: Rutabagas and Celeriac

It's the revenge of the roots! It's definitely a weird-root week, sprinkled with a little cabbage-y goodness.

Rutabagas are traditionally used in pasties, the yooper delicacy that actually has Cornish roots. However, they are much more versatile than this simple meat pie. Think of them like a potato, a much less starchy potato granted but, dense with a solid flesh. Great roasted, (such as in this recipe with maple syrup and chile), in soups (like this apple/rutabaga/squash soup) or mashed

But, for the record, a pasty is still a great idea. If you're not familiar, a pasty is basically just a meat-pie. Every culture seems to h ave some variance of the meat and veggie pie (or just veggie). 

I don't really follow a recipe for this one, but, tend to go a little heavy (and weird) on the veggies, using kohlrabi, turnips, carrots, onions, parsnips, daikon radishes or whatever I have on hand... but, rutabagas, of course. Just make sure they're all chopped in similar sizes. A friend makes a vegetarian version with mushrooms that is also pretty lovely.

Here is a genuine pasty recipe from Lawry's Pasties (located in Ishpeming and Marquette). Get the recipe for pasties here. 

Celeriac can be just as confusing if it's your first time seeing one. 

Celeriac oxidizes quickly so, the bright white and slightly softer, but still dense interior, will begin to brown once cut. 

It tastes exactly like celery but, without the stringiness and occasional bitterness. 

Celeriac can be roasted, made into soups or mashed, just as rutabagas.

Try a whole, roasted celeriac such as this recipe with za'atar... a spice I love to keep on hand to sprinkle on almost anything.

Otherwise, my mother has always made some form of celeriac (or rutabagas) into a gratin. Basically, root veggies cooked with milk and cheese. Try this Jamie Oliver version of a Celeriac Gratin.

Celeriac can also be eaten raw.We frequently grate it into salads, coleslaws or, make it into a full-on slaw with kohlrabi. 

The first time I ever had celeriac was in Southern France... where Celeriac Remoulade is sold ready-made. It's soooo easy and I have no idea why it works but, it's creamy, bright and luscious. Mustard, mayo and lemon juice... that's it.

[CSA]: Week 16

Well, apples didn't work out for this week but, we're hoping to try again next week.

In the meantime, have you thought about Thanksgiving yet?

I know... it's still a million years away (to exaggerate a bit) but, if you're looking for a locally raised turkey, the time to act is now!

Our favorite farmer-athlete-veteran, Katy Stone, is raising some beautiful turkeys and asked that I share her info:

Laetus Pullus Farm Turkeys

$5 a pound Fed certified organic grain Pasture-raised Picked up fresh the week of Thanksgiving If enough people are interested she's willing to work with us to get delivery sites closer to you! Otherwise, pickup is on the farm in Perry. Email Katy at katystone1@mac.com -Be sure to mention I sent you her way!

Speaking of Thanksgiving... winter is right around the corner! Look for details about Winter CSA opportunities next week!  

 

The Menu

Please Choose 8

  • Brussels Sprouts!

    • We received a light frost on Friday night so, they're ready!

    • They're a little smaller than we like with a few cosmetic imperfections but, they taste great.

  • Leeks!

  • Beets!

    • Mostly chioggia (pink and white striped)

    • Sweeter with a less earthy flavor

  • Garlic

  • Red or Yellow Storage Onions

  • Hot Peppers

  • Sweet Bell Peppers and Carmen/Escamillo

  • Curly or Red Russian Kale

  • Rainbow Chard

  • Daikon Radishes

  • Delicata or Carnival Winter Squash!

    • Two of our favorites: Delicata is sweet and delicate with a thin skin. Carnival is equally sweet with an acorn-like appearance and smoother texture than acorn squash.

  • Kossack Kohlrabi

Maybe List

  • Broccoli

  • Parsley!

Recipe Ideas: Winter Squash I

Squash season has only just started but, we figured it would be good for you to have a few tools and ideas so that the slow and steady flow of squash doesn't become overwhelming.

How to Store or Save
Squash is best in a cool, dark place, such as a basement or closet. (Be sure to guard against mice though!) Under the right storage conditions, many squashes can last 2-3 months. 

Often, a little vinegar bath can greatly improve the chances of a long storage life, as it kills any bad bacteria living on the outside of the squash.

If you've cut up more squash than you need for a recipe, you can store it in the fridge for at least four days. Just make sure it's covered, ideally in a closed container or zippered plastic bag.

You can also easily freeze squash. Cut it into small cubes or slices, then, spread it out on a cookie sheet, and flash freeze it. Transfer the squash to a freezer-safe container or plastic bag once it's frozen. Frozen squash will keep indefinitely, but it is best if used within six months to a year.

We also love to roast squash and freeze it for later use. When you start seeing pie pumpkins appear in the share, this is what we love to do!

Roast any pumpkin or squash then puree it so you easily can add it to bread and soup recipes or reheat it for baby food. Check out Smitten Kitchen's Pumpkin Puree. Easy peasy. 

If you've still got a few acorn squash to deal with at home, the classic preparation is to stuff them. You can actually do this with any squash but, for some reason, acorn squash (or Carnival, since it has a similar shape) has become synonymous with stuffing.

A new take on Stuffed Squash (with pistachios and quinoa) makes a meal, from Martha Stewart.

Or, something closer to what we end up doing a lot: squash with pork, apples, rice, and goodness: Try this Stuffed Winter Squash from The Splendid Table

Roasting squash is really the basic technique here though. Whole or cut up, in the oven, at a moderate to high heat. I usually walk away and come back to poke it a bit and see if it's done. All squash cooking is very dependent on the size of the thing and how you cut it.

Still,  there is no wrong way to cook a squash.

Delicata, acorn and probably most squash, can even be popped in the microwave (just be sure to poke holes in it first if you're cooking it whole!). 

If you want the squash to be the main event, try roasting it with brussels sprouts like this Maple and Cinnamon Glazed Delicata Squash.